Meetings, Workshops, Seminars, and Colloquia

Most seminars and colloquia at NASA/GISS are presented during the academic year, September through May.

Formal seminar presentations by visiting scientists are normally held on Friday (11 a.m.) about twice per month during the academic year.

Informal lunchtime seminars (usually presented by NASA/GISS, Columbia/EI, and/or Columbia/LDEO scientists) take place on Wednesdays (1 p.m.) about twice per month, mostly during the academic year.

GISS staff also organize a Tuesday morning (11 a.m.) series of Sea Level Rise seminars (YouTube), presented by scientists from numerous research institutions. This seminar occurs two or three times per month, year-round.

Other special seminars may occur depending the schedules of visiting scientists.

Following are upcoming seminars, workshops and other events of interest to GISS staff and to our research partners. Please note that due to security regulations, as described elsewhere on this page, presentations on the GISS premises are not open to the general public.

Please consult with the event host/contact for connection details if you wish to remotely join any event marked as "Virtual" or "Hybrid".

This event listing was last updated 2022-11-25. All times shown are New York City local.


November 29, 2022
11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. — Virtual
Sea Level Rise Seminar
Topic: Sea-level modeling: from resolving tribal land disputes to inferring Earth's viscoelastic structure
Speaker: Evelyn Powell (Columbia/LDEO)
More info: Abstract
Host/Contact: Patrick Alexander

Sea Level Rise Seminar
Speaker: Evelyn Powell (Columbia/LDEO)
Title: Sea-level modeling: from resolving tribal land disputes to inferring Earth's viscoelastic structure


This is an on-line, virtual presentation only. Please consult with event host Patrick Alexander for connection details.


Abstract:
Our ability to understand past sea-level changes as well as predict polar ice sheet contributions to future sea-level rise depends on our ability to accurately model the Earth’s response to surface mass loading. This deformational, gravitational and rotational response to ice sheet and ocean changes termed Glacial Isostatic Adjustment (GIA) strongly depends on the assumed mantle rheology. In this talk, I will discuss GIA modeling in two regions of complex Earth structure. For the first case study, I will use sea-level modeling to estimate the emergence of an island from Canada’s waters in order to corroborate an Indigenous people’s land claim. In the second case study, I will focus on Antarctica -- a region with limited observational constraints. I will demonstrate that although local geodetic observations such as GNSS may provide invaluable constraints on uncertain mantle viscosity parameters, traditional modeling of crustal deformation and sea level change does not accurately capture the response of the 3-D viscoelastic mantle.


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November 30, 2022
1 p.m. to 2 p.m.— Hybrid
GISS Lunch Seminar
Topic: The role of ocean heat transport on rapid sea ice declines in the Community Earth System Model Large Ensemble
Speaker: Bruno Tremblay (McGill)
More info: Abstract
Host/Contact: Lettie Roach

GISS Lunch Seminar
Speaker: Bruno Tremblay (McGill)
Title: The role of ocean heat transport on rapid sea ice declines in the Community Earth System Model Large Ensemble


This is hybrid presentation. Please consult with event host Lettie Roach for connection details if you wish to virtually attend.


Abstract:
Many global climate models simulates rapid sea ice declines in the Arctic Ocean when the pack ice transitions from a perennial to a seasonal ice cover. Most of these events are linked with anomalous northward Ocean Heat Transport (OHT). Using the Community Earth System Model Large Ensemble (CESM-LE), we find that the pathway by which the ocean heat enters the Arctic (Barents Sea Opening (BSO), Fram Strait or Bering Strait) is key to this link with the rapid declines. The interaction between OHT and sea ice happens mainly over continental shelves where the BSO and Bering Strait OHT are strongly correlated with basal melt, ice-ocean heat flux, absorbed short wave radiation in the ocean and ice growth/melt. The Bering Strait OHT is linked with more rapid declines than the BSO OHT, presumably because of the broader Eurasian shelf. No clear link is found between rapid declines and the Fram Strait OHT: Atlantic water entering the Arctic through Fram Strait circulate around the Arctic Ocean at depth with little vertical heat transfer with the surface waters. In total, 64 of the 79 rapid simulated declines in CESM-LE are linked with anomalous OHT. When the September Sea Ice Extent (SIE) before the rapid decline is located only over deep basins in the central Arctic, we observe a decrease in basal melt during the decline. We hypothesize that this is due to an enhanced stratification that reduces heat transfer between the ocean and the ice. The ice-atmosphere heat flux anomalies are more strongly correlated with ocean heat flux anomalies. Our results suggest that OHT are causing rapid sea ice declines mostly when the SIE is large enough to cover the continental shelves and that the atmosphere is the main driver when the initial SIE is located only over the deep basins.


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December 6, 2022
11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. — Virtual
Sea Level Rise Seminar
Speaker: Roger Creel (Columbia/LDEO)
Host/Contact: Patrick Alexander
December 6, 2022
12 p.m. to 1:15 p.m.— Hybrid
Special Seminar
Topic: Connecting exoplanets to the Archean Earth
Speaker: Jake Eager-Nash (University of Exeter)
Host/Contact: Kostas Tsigaridis
December 7, 2022
1 p.m. to 2:15 p.m. — Virtual
GISS Lunch Seminar
Topic: Global impacts of observed Southern Ocean surface temperature variability
Speaker: Xiyue Sally Zhang (Johns Hopkins Univ)
More info: Abstract
Host/Contact: Clara Orbe

GISS Lunch Seminar
Speaker: Xiyue Sally Zhang (Johns Hopkins Univ)
Title: Global impacts of observed Southern Ocean surface temperature variability


This is an on-line, virtual presentation only. Please consult with event host Clara Orbe for connection details.


Abstract:
Despite global warming, the Southern Ocean (SO) surface cooled from 1979 to recent years. This SO cooling phase was preceded by a warming phase from 1950 to 1978 that warms faster than the global mean surface temperature trend. The global impact of the SO cooling has been investigated recently by a series of GCM simulations where the SO surface temperature anomalies are nudged to observed evolution. The most significant response to observed SO cooling is found in the tropical South Atlantic, where increased clouds and strengthened trade winds cool the sea surface, partially offsetting the radiatively forced warming trend. When we boost the signal by simulating the earlier SO warming phase, a significant response in the tropical eastern Pacific emerges. While the response in the tropical Pacific is weaker than expected, the efficiency of this teleconnection is dependent on the strength of the subtropical low cloud feedback. When we repeat the same experiment with a model with stronger low cloud feedback, we find a more robust global response, including Southeast Pacific cooling, equatorial Pacific drying, Aleutian Low weakening, North Pacific warming, and Antarctic sea-ice expansion. Our results suggest that SO surface temperature variability can contribute to observed tropical Pacific variability, which offers new insights into the model-observation discrepancy in the recent climate trends.


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January 3, 2023
11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. — Virtual
Sea Level Rise Seminar
Speaker: Ben Horten (NTU Singapore)
Host/Contact: Patrick Alexander
January 17, 2023
11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. — Virtual
Sea Level Rise Seminar
Speaker: Mira Berdahl (Univ. Washington)
Host/Contact: Patrick Alexander
January 31, 2023
11 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. — Virtual
Sea Level Rise Seminar
Speaker: Brett Buzzanga (JPL)
Host/Contact: Patrick Alexander

Special Events

There are no workshops, conferences, or other special events (co-)organized by NASA/GISS staff currently announced.

+ Past Meetings & Workshops

Security Note

Federal regulations require that visitors to NASA/GISS arrange in advance for a building pass. Persons attending a GISS seminar or colloquium should contact the event host at least two days in advance of the event for assistance. Please include your affiliation in your e-mail.

Persons who are not U.S. citizens or U.S. permanent residents and who may be planning a visit to GISS require that special arrangements be made. Please co-ordinate with your GISS host on this at least three weeks before your visit.

Due to implementation of the REAL ID Act (2005), a passport, state driver's license or state identification card is required for admittance to the GISS premises, which is considered a federal facility. If you do not have a state-issued license or ID that is considered REAL-ID compliant, we urge you to obtain one before one is required to enter a federal facility. Enforcement of this requirement was expected in October 2021, but has been postponed to May 2023 due to the COVID epidemic.

Please note that depending on the current COVID-19 community transmission level in New York City, visitors may be required to wear a mask while on the premises. As of mid-August 2022, a vaccination attestation form is no longer required to enter.

All visitors can expect to have their bags searched upon entry to GISS. This may include having to answer questions about personal items, including any medication the visitor may be carrying.