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New York City Research Initiative

Research Projects at Rutgers University

Go to projects in: 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006

Rutgers University — 2014

Convoy of Autonomous Vehicles
Team Members

Principle Investigator (PI):
Dr. Haim Baruh

Team Mumbers:
Patricia McCarthy, High School Teacher Nour Srouji, Undergraduate Student
Naomi Javitt, High School Student

Thanks to:
Han Sun

Final Research Presentation
Summary

An Autonomous vehicle is a car that will drive independently of any human control. A convoy of vehicles are vehicles that are capable of following a lead vehicle by sensing and tracking. Our research added another car to the convoy and a newer version of the camera sensor with an improved camera.

Rutgers University — 2013

Creating a Convoy of Autonomous Vehicles
Team Members

Principle Investigator (PI):
Dr. Haim Baruh

Team Mumbers:
Mariano Buttitta, High School Teacher Joe DiDomenico, Undergraduate Student
Pranav Subramanian, Hish School Student
Nour Srouji, High School Student

Final Research Presentation
Summary

Abstract: Autonomous vehicles, those with the ability to carry out tasks independently of human control, are becoming increasingly more prevalent in modern society. Such vehicles have the ability to reduce costs and eliminate risks associated with human error in many fields. The aim of this project was to design, construct, and program and autonomous vehicle capable of following another vehicle using color tracking and ultrasonic sensing, which could then be replicated to form an entire convoy of autonomous vehicles. By doing this, we hoped to investigate the effectiveness of color tracking as a method for controlling the movement of autonomous vehicles in a convoy. The vehicle constructed demonstrated the ability to utilize color tracking in order to follow a colored object, specifically a large, red sphere, within a controlled environment.

Rutgers University — 2012

Autonomous Vehicle Control via Color Tracking and Ultrasonic Sensing
Team Members

Principle Investigator (PI):
Dr. Haim Baruh

Team Mumbers:
Joshua Metersky, Undergraduate Student
Richard Quan, Undergraduate Student
David Wu, High School Student

Final Research Presentation
Summary

Abstract: An autonomous vehicle is one that is able to operate independently of human control through feedback returned by various sensors. These vehicles are often used to reduce problems, risks and costs that arise from human involvement. The goal of this project is to design and program a convoy in which autonomous vehicles follows a human controlled lead car. In order to develop this system of vehicles, multiple sensors have to be used to keep the convoy together. Standard radio controlled cars are used as the vehicles in the system and were equipped with Arduino microcontrollers, the CMUcam4 camera for color tracking as well as the Parallax Ping))) ultrasonic sensor. Servos are also mounted on the vehicles in order to allow the camera and ping to turn according to the lead car. Using these sensors, the distance between the vehicles is used to determine the motor speed, while the input from the CMUcam4 allows the vehicles to follow the ones ahead when they turn. These sensors continuously return data, allowing for the following cars to adjust to any changes in the system.

Rutgers University — 2011

Autonomous Vehicle Control via Color Tracking and Ultrasonic Sensing
Team Members

Principle Investigator (PI):
Dr. Haim Baruh

Team Mumbers:
Przemyslaw Lasota, Undergraduate Student
Ahmed Ghrael, Undergraduate Student
Kimberly Lam, High School Student

Final Research Presentation
Summary

Abstract: Autonomously controlled vehicles utilize various sensors to survey their environment in order to operate independently of human interaction. Such vehicles can work in conjunction with one another to form a convoy with only one human controlled lead car. This technology could be integrated into various subdivisions, including military, commercial, and industrial sectors. In order to develop such technology, a mathematical model which defines the general motion of a vehicle must be constructed. Also, a set of control laws that guide the autonomous vehicle is needed. MATLAB was used to write a simulation program based on the model and control laws to test the autonomous vehicle's artificial intelligence before implementation onto a physical car. Standard radio controlled (RC) cars are used as the vehicles. The follower vehicles are equipped with Arduino microcontrollers, motor shields, CMUcam2 color tracking cameras, Parallax Ping))) ultrasonic sensors, and servos to carry out all necessary measurements and calculations. Using these components, the distance and offset angle to the vehicle ahead is found and converted to steering angle and motor speed outputs. The process of analyzing, processing, and executing repeats continuously, resulting in efficient function of the autonomous vehicle control systems.

Rutgers University — 2010

Verification of a Winter Storm Scale Developed for Nor'easters
Team Members

Principle Investigator (PI):
Dr. Steven Decker

Team Mumbers:
Alyssa Caroprese, Undergraduate Student
David Kelly, High School Student
Kelvin Quarcoo, High School Teacher

Final Research Presentation
Summary

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to verify a newly developed Winter Storm Scale (WSS) for Nor'easters and other winter storms affecting the Northeastern United States. Like the Fujita Scale and Saffir-Simpson scale for tornadoes and hurricanes, respectively, the WSS will measure the intensity of Nor'easters and other winter storms using a convenient zero to five. Very similar to the Fujita Scale, the WSS values are calculated in a post-storm analysis using maximum sustained wind, wind gust, total storm snowfall, total storm ice accretion, and minimum visibility. The WSS is applied to all storms observed at Newark Liberty International Airport (EWR) from October 1995 to April 2010 which contained at least one surface report of "wintery precipitation" (i.e. snow, freezing rain, sleet, etc.). The calculated WSS values are compared to the Rooney Disruption Scale, an existing storm measurement scale, to investigate the relationship between WSS value and societal impact. Two hypotheses were tested: 1) The distribution of winter storms are such that zeros are more common than fives, and 2) The WSS values, or meteorological ranking, are an acceptable measure of societal disruption (verified by analyzing a scatter plot of WSS values versus Rooney Disruption Scale values).

Rutgers University — 2009

A Convoy of Autonomous Vehicles Using a Method of Light Detection
Team Members

Principle Investigator (PI):
Dr. Haim Baruh

Mentor:
Kelvin Quarcoo, High School Teacher

Researchers:
Alexey Titovich, Graduate Student
David Kelly, High School Student

Final Research Presentation
Summary

Abstract: An autonomous vehicle is any vehicle that can drive itself from one locatin to another without the use of human intervention. When put in a convoy, several autonomous vehicles can follow one lead vehicle and mimic its movements. This can have many uses in the private, commercial, and government sectors. By using a CMUcam2, an Arduino Microprocessor, a Motorshield, and three Remote Controlled (RC) cars, it is possible to successfully create a prototype autonomous convoy based on light detection technology. One of the three RC cars remained unchanged. This car woud act as the Lead Vehicle — the vehicle that the autonomous vehicles would follow. The other two would be interfaced with a CMUcam2, an Arduino Microprocessor, and a Motorshield. These cars would become the two autonomous follower vehicles. The autonomous vehicles worked in several steps. First, the Arduino Microprocessor would send a command to the CMUcam2 telling it to track a certain color. Next, it would send another command asking for information about the color it is tracking. This information would be sent back to the Arduino, where it would be processed and used to determine the turning angle and velocity. After the calculations, the Arduino would send commands to the servo motor controlling the angle of the front wheels and the Motorshield controlling the rear wheels. The Motorshield would read the commands, and vary the voltage going to the DC motor controlling the rear wheels, and thus control the speed of the vehicle. When completely interfaced together, this method provides a reliable method to create a convoy of autonomous vehicles.

Rutgers University — 2006

Autonomous Vehicle Control System
Team Members

Principle Investigator (PI):
Dr. Haim Baruh

Researchers:
Lucian Iorga, Graduate Student
Christopher Bussetti, Sharp Apprentice

Final Research Presentation
Summary

Platform development:
* Use of a Rutgers MAE undergraduate design
* Repairs & improvements

Modifications:
* The development of a control law
* Need a robust control law
* Test new approach towards robust control developed at Rutgers MAE

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