About GISS

Research at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) emphasizes a broad study of global change, which is an interdisciplinary initiative addressing natural and man-made changes in our environment that occur on various time scales — from one-time forcings such as volcanic explosions, to seasonal and annual effects such as El Niño, and on up to the millennia of ice ages — and that affect the habitability of our planet.

GISS is located at Columbia University in New York City. The institute is a laboratory in the Earth Sciences Division of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and is affiliated with the Columbia Earth Institute and School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Recent Publications

Richardson, T.B., P.M. Forster, T. Andrews, O. Boucher, G. Faluvegi, D. Fläschner, Ø. Hodnebrog, M. Kasoar, A. Kirkevåg, J.-F. Lamarque, G. Myhre, D. Olivié, B.H. Samset, D. Shawki, D. Shindell, T. Takemura, and A. Voulgarakis, 2018: Drivers of precipitation change: An energetic understanding. J. Climate, 31, no. 23, 9641-9657, doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-17-0240.1.

Singh, D., S.P. McDermid, B.I. Cook, M.J. Puma, L. Nazarenko, and M. Kelley, 2018: Distinct influences of land-cover and land-management on seasonal climate. J. Geophys. Res. Atmos., early on-line, doi:10.1029/2018JD028874.

Doicu, A., and M.I. Mishchenko, 2019: An overview of methods for deriving the radiative transfer theory from the Maxwell equations. II: Approach based on the Dyson and Bethe-Salpeter equations. J. Quant Sectrosc. Radiat. Transfer, 223, 25-36, doi:10.1016/j.jqsrt.2018.10.032.

Wong, S., C. Naud, B.H. Karhn, L. Wu, and E.J. Fetzer, 2018: Coupling of precipitation and cloud structures in oceanic extratropical cyclones to large-scale moisture flux convergence. J. Climate, 31, no. 23, 9565-0584, doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-18-0115.1.

Ottaviani, M., J. Chowdhary, and B. Cairns, 2019: Remote sensing of the ocean surface refractive index via short-wave infrared polarimetry. Remote Sens. Environ., 221, 14-23, doi:10.1016/j.rse.2018.10.016.