About GISS

Research at the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) emphasizes a broad study of global change, which is an interdisciplinary initiative addressing natural and man-made changes in our environment that occur on various time scales — from one-time forcings such as volcanic explosions, to seasonal and annual effects such as El Niño, and on up to the millennia of ice ages — and that affect the habitability of our planet.

GISS is located at Columbia University in New York City. The institute is a laboratory in the Earth Sciences Division of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and is affiliated with the Columbia Earth Institute and School of Engineering and Applied Science.

Recent Publications

Myers, T.A., C.R. Mechoso, G.V. Cesana, M.J. DeFlorio, and D.E. Waliser, 2018: Cloud feedback key to marine heatwave off Baja California. Geophys. Res. Lett., early on-line, doi:10.1029/2018GL078242.

Steiger, N.J., J.E. Smerdon, E.R. Cook, and B.I. Cook, 2018: A reconstruction of global hydroclimate and dynamical variables over the Common Era. Sci. Data, 5, 180086, doi:10.1038/sdata.2018.86.

Ito, G., M.I. Mishchenko, and T.D. Glotch, 2018: Radiative-transfer modeling of spectra of planetary regoliths using cluster- based dense packing modifications. J. Geophys. Res. Planets, early on-line, doi:10.1029/2018JE005532.

Liu, L., D. Shawki, A. Voulgarakis, M. Kasoar, B.H. Samset, G. Myhre, P.M. Forster, Ø. Hodnebrog, J. Sillmann, S.G. Aalbergsjø, O. Boucher, G. Faluvegi, T. Iversen, A. Kirkevåg, J.-F. Lamarque, D. Olivié, T. Richardson, D. Shindell, and T. Takemura, 2018: A PDRMIP multi-model study on the impacts of regional aerosol forcings on global and regional precipitation. J. Climate, 31, no. 11, 4429-4447, doi:10.1175/JCLI-D-17-0439.1.

Myhre, G., B.H. Samset, Ø. Hodnebrog, T. Andrews, O. Boucher, G. Faluvegi, D. Fläschner, P.M. Forster, M. Kasoar, V. Kharin, A. Kirkevåg, J.-F. Lamarque, D. Olivié, T.B. Richardson, D. Shawki, D. Shindell, K.P. Shine, C.W. Stjern, T. Takemura, and A. Voulgarakis, 2018: Sensible heat has significantly affected the global hydrological cycle over the historical period. Nature Comm., 9, no. 1, 1922, doi:10.1038/s41467-018-04307-4.