Research News and Features

2006 News and Features

Following are news releases and science briefs from calendar 2006. Listings are also available for 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2005, and 2004.

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Study the Past, Predict the Future

Scientists use the theories they have constructed to explain the paleoclimate data record to understand modern climate and to predict how we can expect it to change in coming years or decades. (Nov. '06)
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Sea Level Rise, Hurricanes and New York City

NASA's study of rising sea levels, hurricane storm surge and their potential effects on New York City is presented at a science conference. (Oct '06)
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World Warmth Edging Ancient Levels

A new study by NASA GISS climatologists has found that the world's temperature is reaching a level that has not been seen in thousands of years. (Sep '06)
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Observing and Modeling African Storms

Regional climate models give more detailed structure to the spatial distributions of weather variables. After a few days of initial tuning, one GISS model simulates realistic summer storms over West Africa. (July '04/May '06)
+ Read Science Brief

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Smog and Arctic Warming

A news GISS study has found that ozone "smog" in the troposphere was responsible for one-third to half of the observed warming trend in the Arctic during winter and spring. (Mar. '06)
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Interaction of Ozone and Sulfate Pollution

A recent GISS study of the cross influences of ozone and sulfate "precursor" gases over the next 25 years has revealed surprising effects relevant to air quality management (Mar. '06)
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Interaction between Climate and Storms

If you live somewhere between Jacksonville, Florida and Juneau, Alaska or between Southern Brazil and southern Argentina, you may have noticed there are less rainy and snowy days. (Mar. '06)
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Trial of the Century — Act II

Evidence regarding the response of polar ice sheets and sea level rise to rising temperatures is considered in the trial of carbon dioxide and co-conspirators. (Feb. '06)
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Modeling Abrupt Climate Change

To test how well a climate model predicts possible changes in ocean circulation due to climate change, GISS scientists have simulated the effects of a massive flood of fresh water some 8000 years ago. (Jan/Feb '06)
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Cooling an Urban Heat Island

Using satellite observations and climate models, GISS scientists have been working in cooperation with public officials and community organizations to turn down the thermostat on New York City's "heat island" effect. (Jan. '06)
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Global Surface Temperatures in 2005

The global surface temperature in 2005 was probably the hottest on record. Although 2005 tied 1998 within the margin of error, the 2005 mark is particularly noteworthy because no El Niño contributed to the year's heating. (Jan. '06)
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