Research News and Features

2005 News and Features

Following are news releases and science briefs from calendar 2005. Listings are also available for 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, and 2004.

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Tracing the Water Cycle, Isotopically

Tracking the movements of water through the climate system is a primary concern of climatologists. How do we follow water's path from a particular source? How well do climate models agree with observations? (Dec. '05)
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Mineral Clues to Past Climates

How do we know what Earth's climate was in the ancient past? Scientists can use a wide variety of geologic evidence as indirect "proxies" to reconstruct the record of past temperature, rainfall and wind. (Nov. '05)
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Volcanic Blast Location Influences Climate Reaction

A new study using the GISS climate model demonstrates that the climatic effects of a volcanic explosion depend not only on the size of the blast but also on its latitude. (Aug. '05)
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Methane's Climate Impact May Be Twice Previous Estimates

According to new calculations examining the role of chemically reactive greenhouse gases, methane's effect on warming the world's climate may be double what is currently thought. (July '05)
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Titan: Land of Lakes?

Scientists are fascinated by a dark, lake-like feature recently observed on Saturn's moon Titan. NASA's Cassini spacecraft captured a series of images showing a marking, darker than anything else around it. (June '05)
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Climate Change Impacts on the NYC Region

With over half the world's people living in cities, it's important to understand how climate change might affect urban areas. A new web site answers basic questions about climate change and how it might affect New York City. (May '05)
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Marshes Reveal Climate History Near NYC

Marshes in the lower Hudson Valley near New York City offer an amazingly detailed history of the area's climate, including a 500-year drought from 800 to 1300 A.D., the Little Ice Age, and the impacts of European settlers. (May '05)
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Earth's Energy Out of Balance

Earth is absorbing about 0.85 Watts of energy per square meter more than it radiates back to space, and a sizable chunk of that excess energy is "hiding" in the oceans. (Apr. '05)
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Black and White: Soot on Ice

New findings show soot may be contributing to changes near the North Pole, including increased melting of sea ice and snow and warmer atmospheric temperatures. (Mar. '05)
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Cassini Reveals Titan as Active, Earth-like World

Cassini flyby images are revealing Saturn's moon Titan has has a surface shaped largely by Earth-like processes of tectonics, erosion, winds, and perhaps volcanism. (Mar. '05)
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Earth Gets a Warm Feeling All Over

Although natural variability resulted in a cool summer in the United States, the average global surface temperatures for climatological 2004 turned out the fourth warmest. (Feb. '05)
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Trial of the Century: Co-Conspirators Convicted

They haven't been caught "red handed", but evidence is overwhelming that carbon dioxide and co-conspirators methane and nitrous oxide are creating a predicament for Earth's climate. (Feb. '05)
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NASA Scientist Wins AMS Award

GISS scientist William B. Rossow has won the 2005 Verner E. Suomi Award given by the American Meteorological Society, the nation's leading professional society for atmospheric sciences. (Jan. '05)
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Watching Earth's Climate Change in the Classroom

A new NASA computer model allows educators and students to simulate the global climate and study climate change in the classroom. (Jan. '05)
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