Research News and Features

2004 News and Features

Following are news releases and science briefs from calendar 2004. Listings are also available for 2014, 2013, 2012, 2011, 2010, 2009, 2008, 2007, 2006, and 2005.

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Cassini Encounters Titan

Cassini entered Saturn orbit in June 2004 and has already made exciting observations of the moon Titan. GISS scientists Anthony Del Genio and Michael Allison are involved in three of the instrument teams. (Dec. '04)
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Scientific American Top 50 Scientists

Climatologists Drew Shindell and Gavin Schmidt of NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies, New York, have received Scientific American magazine's Top 50 Scientist award. (Nov. '04)
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Acid Rain and Methane in Wetlands

Acid rain is an unlikely help in limiting the greenhouse gas methane. Scientists recently discovered that low levels of sulfate in acid rain block some bacteria found in wetlands from producing methane. (Nov. '04)
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Potential for Antarctic Climate Change

Antarctica has cooled over the last 30 years, but the trend is likely to rapidly reverse, according to a new study which examines the effect of depleted ozone and increasing greenhouse gases. (Oct. '04)
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Mars: Signs of a Watery Past

"Follow the water" has been NASA's chief guideline for the exploration of Mars. Evidence is rapidly accumulating from satellites and roving landers that the Red Planet was once much wetter, with a more clement climate. (Oct. '04)
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Methane: Climate Super-Star

In 30 years, our knowledge of methane has traveled from obscure trace gas to important greenhouse forcing, both natural and anthr opogenic. What caused this change, and what role has methane played in climate, both in the past and future? (Sep. '04)
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Observing and Modeling African Storms

Regional climate models give more detailed structure to the spatial distributions of weather variables. After a few days of initial tuning, one GISS model simulates realistic weather scenarios such as summer storms over West Africa. (Jul. '04)
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Atmospheric Tango

Ozone affects climate, and climate affects ozone. Temperature, humidity, winds, and the presence of other chemicals in the atmosphere influence ozone formation, and the presence of ozone, in turn, affects those atmospheric constituents. (Feb. '04)
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The Sun vs. the Volcano

Over the past 150 years, human activities have changed many aspects of the atmosphere that influence climate. Before then, climate change was simpler; decadal and centennial variations were driven only by volcanic eruptions and solar variability. (Jan. '04)
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Clouds and Sulfate Aerosols

Our ability to predict future climate change hinges on our understanding of aerosols. One of the most important aerosol, sulfate, cools the climate by reflecting sunlight and by serving as condensation points for clouds which also reflect sunlight. (Jan. '04)
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