Special Events

Upcoming noteworthy events include:

Clouds, Their Properties, and Their Climate Feedbacks

A symposium to be held June 6-8, 2017, at Schapiro Hall on the campus of Columbia University, New York, N.Y..
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+ Past Meetings & Workshops

Other Upcoming Events

Following are upcoming seminars, workshops and other events of interest to GISS staff and our research partners. Please note that due to security regulations, these presentations are not open to the general public.

Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016
11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Special Seminar
Topic: Using satellite observations to evaluate the representation of clouds in climate models
Speaker: Gregory Cesana (JPL)
More info: Abstract, Web Link
Contact: Tony Del Genio

Special Seminar
Speaker: Gregory Cesana (JPL)
Title: Using satellite observations to evaluate the representation of clouds in climate models

Abstract: The ubiquitous presence of clouds within the troposphere (global total cloud frequency about 70%) strongly characterizes the radiative balance of the earth-atmosphere system. Knowledge of the distribution of clouds and their response to a warmer climate are crucial to anticipate the evolution of our future climate. Yet, this challenge remains subject to large uncertainties in climate modeling, wherein the vertical structure of clouds plays a crucial role. Due to the potential for significant variations in the height, temperature and microphysical properties of a cloud, there is a significant range of radiative impacts from clouds. In this presentation, I will take advantage of active sensor observations from the CALIPSO satellite and recent climate simulations from multi-model experiments to characterize systematic biases in the representation of clouds and cloud microphysics in contemporary climate models. To this end, I will introduce the satellite simulator approach, which reduces uncertainties related to instrument biases and ensures a consistent comparison between models and observations. Then, I will show a couple of examples of model biases focused on the vertical structure of clouds and the transition between supercooled liquid clouds and ice clouds. Finally, I will determine whether these biases are systematic or not, and explore their origin.

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Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2016
1:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.
GISS Lunch Seminar
Topic: Hyperwall 101
Speaker: Avraham Persin
More info: Abstract, Web Link
Contact: Kenneth Sinclair

GISS Lunch Seminar
Speaker: Avraham Persin
Title: Hyperwall 101

Abstract: Abstract: If a picture is worth a thousand words, then a hyperwall animation is worth a million. The ability to display data at high resolutions across multiple monitors is an extremely powerful tool. First, we will focus on how to develop graphics that will look good on the hyperwall. We will then take a look at a Python module I developed that contains common functionality for reading datasets, plotting data, creating high resolution frames, and stringing frames together to create animations. Once your visualization is created we will learn how to use the SAGE2 software to display it on the hyperwall.

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Friday, Dec. 9, 2016
11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Friday Seminar
Topic: Volcanic Impacts on ENSO
Speaker: Georgiy L. Stenchikov (King Abdullah University of Science and Tech)
More info: Abstract
Contact: Allegra LeGrande

Friday Seminar
Speaker: Georgiy L. Stenchikov (King Abdullah University of Science and Tech)
Title: Volcanic Impacts on ENSO

Abstract: Observations and model simulations of the climate responses to strong explosive low latitude volcanic eruptions suggest a significant increase in the likelihood of El Nino during the post-eruption years, though model results have been inconclusive and have varied in magnitude and even sign. In this study, we test how this spread of responses depends on the initial phase of El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) in the eruption year, and on the eruption timing. We employ the GFDL CM2.1 global coupled general circulation model to investigate the impact of the Pinatubo 1991 eruption, assuming that in 1991 ENSO would be in Central or Eastern Pacific El Nino, La Nina, or neutral phase. We obtain statistically significant El Nino responses in a year after the eruption in all cases except La Nina one, which does not show any response. The eruption has a weaker impact on the Eastern Pacific El Ninos, than on the Central Pacific El Ninos. The sensitivity analysis suggests that the El Nino responses to the volcanic eruptions occurring in summer can be more pronounced than for the winter and spring eruptions. The fact that climate responses are dependent on the eruption season and the initial ENSO phase (including different El Nino flavors and strength) may help to reconcile the inconsistencies among past studies. -- also thanks to Evgeniya Predybaylo, Andrew T. Wittenberg, Fanrong Zeng

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Friday, Dec. 9, 2016
3:30 p.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Special Seminar
Topic: Symmetric Equations on the Surface of a Sphere
Speaker: Gary Russell
More info: Abstract
Contact: Gary Russell

Special Seminar
Speaker: Gary Russell
Title: Symmetric Equations on the Surface of a Sphere

Abstract: Standard vector calculus formulas of Cartesian three space are projected onto the surface of a sphere. This produces symmetric equations with three nonindependent horizontal velocity components. Each orthogonal axis has a velocity component that rotates around its axis (eastward velocity rotates around the north-south axis) and a specific angular momentum component that is the product of the velocity component times the cosine of axis’ latitude. Angular momentum components align with the fixed axes and simplify several formulas, whereas the rotating velocity components are not orthogonal and vary with location. Three symmetric coordinates allow vector resolution and calculus operations continuously over the whole spherical surface, which is not possible with only two coordinates. The symmetric equations are applied to one-layer shallow water models on cube-sphere and icosahedral grids, the latter being computationally simple and applicable to an ocean domain. Model results are presented for three different initial conditions and five different resolutions.

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Monday, Jan. 9, 2017
11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
NExSS Seminar
Speaker: Eugenio Simoncini (INAF - Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri)
More info: Web Link
Contact: Tony Del Genio
Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2017
1:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.
GISS Lunch Seminar
Speaker: Stuart Gaffin
More info: Web Link
Contact: Kenneth Sinclair
Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2017
1:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.
GISS Lunch Seminar
Speaker: Disha Sharma
More info: Web Link
Contact: Kenneth Sinclair
Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2017
1:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.
GISS Lunch Seminar
More info: Web Link
Contact: Kenneth Sinclair
Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017
11:00 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
Special Seminar
Speaker: Sylvia Dee
Contact: Allegra LeGrande
Wednesday, Feb. 22, 2017
1:00 p.m. to 2:15 p.m.
GISS Lunch Seminar
Speaker: Michael Allison
More info: Web Link
Contact: Kenneth Sinclair

This event listing was last updated 2016-12-07.

Seminars & Colloquia

Most seminars at GISS are held during the academic year, September through May.

Formal seminar presentations by visiting scientists are held many Fridays at 11:00 a.m.

Informal lunchtime presentations by NASA GISS staff take place on Wednesdays at 1:00 p.m. about twice per month.

Other special seminars occur from time to time as visitors' schedules permit.

Security Note

Regulations require that visitors arrange in advance for a building pass. Persons attending a NASA GISS seminar or colloquium should contact the event host at least two days in advance of the event for assistance. Please include your affiliation in your e-mail.

Effective July 21, 2014, the implementation of Phase II of the Real-ID Act (2005) restricts the use of state ID from non-compliant states (including New York) as an acceptable form of identification for federal facilities such as NASA GISS. If you are scheduled to visit GISS and only have a standard driver's license from a non-compliant state, please be sure to bring a second form of ID (passport, military ID, etc.).

Special arrangements must be made for persons who are not U.S. citizens or U.S. permanent residents. Such persons planning to attend a NASA GISS event should contact the event host at least 20 days in advance of visiting GISS.